4th Of July Traditions

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Do you remember on my last blog post I said I love capturing the details of an event? Well, we had 4th of July this month and I captured those little details that I think make the holiday so special. The meaning behind the holiday is important but I also think the traditions are important. Traditions repeated from year to year and passed from generation to generation have a special history that is shared among many people.

You will see that I painted with light in the first picture. What a very fun technique! You can do the same if you copy the settings. All of these pictures were taken with my Nikon D3000 and 50mm lens.

365 Projects & Camping

pin16I have stopped doing my prompted 365 projects. Gasp! Truthfully, I became bored with the prompts because I had a lot of repeats. My two goals with the 365 projects were to pick up my camera everyday and to challenge myself to take pictures of things I normally wouldn’t take a picture of. I still pick up my camera everyday and I have new challenges. Right now I am challenging myself to gain experience with other people’s families and about 1x/week I do look at a prompt.

In other news, a few weeks ago we went camping. I love camping and I love capturing the details of an event and what makes it so special. Here are a few camping photos. Let me know if any of these bring a feeling of comfort. Also, if you want me to capture details of a special event for you, let me know.

 

A New Tool for My Camera

pin1I briefly said in my last post that I bought an attachable macro lens. Well, they are actually called macro filters and I love them. I am having quite fun with them and when the pictures come out sharp, they give me a whole new perspective of an object. I have wanted a macro lens for awhile but never bought one because of the cost. This is a cheap way around that. Here’s the article I read about them.

9 Tips for Using Macro Filters

It does take getting used to them but well worth it. You may notice in a couple of the pictures below that the focus is not quite perfect. From my understanding, using a tripod helps because the depth of field is so shallow it is easy to lose your focus.

I love the crayons because I never really noticed how dirty crayons look from being marked up by other crayons.  I love the picture of the dandelion because it is in focus and I can see so much detail I never noticed before. The paper clip is not so neat but the details of the wooden table below are. The crab apple buds are beautiful and the seedling is not so interesting but the detail of the dirt below is interesting. I love how macro photography shows me details that I look over every day. This is just another way to show you beauty in the everyday mundane life, which is my mission with photography.

I will continue to experiment.

Here are some of the fun photos I have taken so far.

 

 

 

Using Manual and How I Learned

pin2As you know, I am a student of Shultz Photography School. I am in his Grads program but I also purchased his Photo Fix. Photo Fix is where I learned manual so I cannot go into detail as to how he taught it but the program helped give me a visual in my mind when I use manual mode. Eventually the settings became second nature. Now when I see a low number aperture, I think lots of light and bokeh. When I see a slow shutter speed I think lots of light but possible blur. When I see a low ISO I think low light but less grain. It is a bit more complex than that but the more you shoot in manual, the more you will automatically have those associations. Also, the more you shoot in manual, the more you will know which settings will work. For example, I always start off with ISO 400 in my house. If I am outside and it is sunny, I automatically start with ISO 100. If it is cloudy, I will start with ISO 100 or 200. Most of my photos are indoors so usually my camera is on ISO 400. Here are the steps for when I shoot indoors on a sunny day.

  1.       ISO 400 (usually my camera is already on this setting)
  2.       Aperture (usually as low as I can get it because I like bokeh)
  3.       Shutter speed
    1. I start minimally with 1/50 (for my 50 mm lens) because that will at least reduce camera shake
    2. Adjust shutter speed and try and get my meter at ‘0’.

The same process is similar if I am shooting outdoors on a sunny day.

  1. ISO 100
  2. Aperture (as low as I can get it)
  3. Shutter speed
    1. Start with a minimum of 1/50
    2. Adjust shutter speed to get my meter at ‘0’.

In other news…I bought some attachable macro lenses. Here is a picture using my macro x10. I will go into more detail in another blog post.

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Also, I apologize for not being around the last month but family has been in town all month and every bit of free time has been dedicated to them.

I hope you get outside and enjoy the beautiful spring. I love all of the flowering trees!

Editing Photos – From a Hobbyist’s Perspective

pin3I have watched a few professional photographers edit photos. Honestly, I do not like editing much. I feel it takes a lot of time and it can be a rabbit hole that you can get lost in. However, being that I still consider myself an intermediate hobbyist photographer, I figure I can probably offer a different view on how I edit photos. Below you will find what I do most of the time. I use Adobe Lightroom to edit photos. Once in a great while I use Adobe Photoshop but I am not including that down below.

  1.       Adjust Exposure
  2.       Adjust White balance (look at skin tones)
  3.       Check Enable Profile Corrections (under Lens Correction)
  4.       Crop and Straighten
  5.       Adjust Shadows or Highlights if I feel there is too much or too little
  6.       Adjust Clarity
  7.       Adjust Vibrance
  8.       Adjust Saturation carefully (you do not want too much typically)
  9.       Possibly use a preset (usually a Shultz Photo School preset)
  10.       Possibly tweak preset by doing numbers 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, & 8 again.

Well, that is what works for me at the moment. If you have any questions, feel free to ask them. Adios!

 

In a Hobbyist’s Photography Bag

pin4Often when I read about photographers and what they have in their camera bag, it is usually a professional photographer (someone who actually makes money off their photos). Well, I am not making money off my photos so I would not consider myself a professional. My budget is far less and I find it harder to justify spending money on photography. In thinking about this, I realize that my perspective is different. So what does this intermediate hobbyist photographer have in their bag? Well here you go.

  1.       Nikon D3000
  2.       Nikkor 50 mm f/1.8 lens
  3.       Nikon 18 – 55 mm f/3.5-5.6
  4.       Nikon 55 – 200 mm f/4-5.6
  5.       Amazon Wireless remote
  6.       Aperlite Off camera flash
  7.       Tripod (not actually in my bag but I do use it)
  8.       Mini soft box for my flash

My favorite lens of the three I have is the 50 mm. It allows me to have beautiful bokeh, which I love and it allows me to get more light into my photos. Because I enjoy the low aperture on my 50 mm so much, now I want a wider-angle lens and a macro lens with small apertures as well.

Photo Project Routine

pin5I have been asked how I do two 365 projects. I have established a routine. So far I have only missed one prompt from the last 87 days and it was due to the fact that I kept putting it off even though I knew what I wanted to photograph.

  1. Right after I wake up, I check what my prompts are. I do this right away because some of the prompts need to be done right away.
  2. When I read the prompt, I usually envision something right away. Yes, you can do this too, especially with objects. For example, what do you envision when you hear the word “sharp”? How about “in my cup”? I envision a knife for “sharp” and my morning coffee for “in my cup”.
  3. I take what I envisioned and think of how I can incorporate my daughter20170302-DSC_0507. Obviously, this cannot work with every prompt such as for the word “sharp”.
  4. Sometimes I think of how I can be more creative with my first vision. For example with the word “breakfast”, I thought of cereal in a bowl. That seemed extremely boring to me so I thought of cereal pouring out of a box. Here are some other ideas for how you can be more creative:
    1. Aerial view (such as the 2nd picture)
    2. Low angle
    3. Wide angle (picture from far away)

      20170224-DSC_1135
      “Digging for Treasure” was the prompt
    4. Close up angle
    5. Create interesting light
      1. Dramatic light with deep shadows and bright light
      2. Sunset light (i.e. golden hour)
      3. Use a flash
    6. Nature
      1. Fog20170122-DSC_1372PS
      2. Snow
    7. Shutter speed

Lastly, remember you are a busy person and sometimes you cannot expect every photo to be perfect because we only have so much time and energy to make it perfect.

Your Dream

pin6What do you dream to do? I think most of us are scared to say it out loud for many reasons. I know I am scared because I am afraid people will think that I am not capable of doing it. What if they end up being right? I am also scared because if I state it, people may help me out, and then what if I end up doing a terrible job? I wish I can remember where I read it but somewhere someone said that you should just state your dream out loud because that is the first step. I have been tiptoeing around taking that first step. Ultimately, I have been scared of failure but here it goes…

I want to show people the beauty of their family’s everyday by taking lifestyle pictures of their family…especially families with young kids (4 years and under). I want to take pictures of your kids reading books, playing with toys, running around your backyard, etc. All that stuff that many people would find mundane but you love. I would also like to get the parents interacting with their kids. If you are looking for portrait type pictures, that is not what I would prefer to photograph.

There you go, I said it. Now I am wondering if people even want pictures of their kids doing those things. To me, they are special moments that will not last forever. Capturing these moments with my child, forces me to stop what I am doing, be mindful of the moment, and see the beauty. Below are pictures of the type of photography I want to do for you and  if you are interested, let me know.

So now I go back to the beginning of this blog and ask you the same question. What do you dream to do and why do you want to do it?

 

What You Can Learn Before Getting a DSLR

pin7Photography can be an expensive hobby. Any hobby can be expensive. It is easy to get caught up in thinking that you need the most pricey equipment in order to get the best results. Before you run out and spend money, know that a good photo has a lot to do with the photographer. Google iPhone photos and you will see what I mean. If your goal is to eventually buy more expensive equipment but you cannot afford it right now, you can still learn what makes a good photo. Here are some basic photography skills you can learn. These basics are a very important foundation.

  1. Composition
    1. Rule of Thirds                                              20160711-dsc_0661
      1. Horizontally
      2. Vertically
      3. Four Cross Points
    2. Leading Lines
      1. Real lines
      2. Implied lines
      3. Depth of field
    3. Negative Space
  2. Lighting
    1. Natural Light vs. Shade
      1. Which one do you put your subject in?
      2. Which way do you face your subject?20170107-dsc_0314
    2. Artificial Light
      1. White Balance
        1. What are the different types?
        2. When do you use them?

If you have heard of these, I recommend reviewing them. You may notice some details you missed. Also, the more you read about them, the more those rules will come naturally to you. Have fun!

Old Photos

pin8I think I am a little obsessed with photography. I just joined ClickIn Moms. Once again, i don’t know where it is going to take me just like I didn’t know where Shultz Photo School would take me. I am excited to learn more.

My blog is not just a place to learn about how to photograph well. It is also to show you my journey from being a beginner to something more. When I see a professional photographer’s work, I really wonder how they were at the beginning of their photography journey. If they were to do this, then I could relate to them more and realize that if they improved, so could I. Yes, I do have faith in myself but when that faith waivers, seeing other people’s past struggles helps. With that being said, here are some past photos.

I would like to add that whether or not you know how to take pictures well, you can still document life. Even professionals will hold onto photos with mistakes (i.e. blurriness) if the photo stirs emotion in them.